Dr. Joan Casey studies noise exposure along racial, ethnic and socioeconomic lines in the United States

As the number of white residents in a neighborhood declines, noise rises. But noise pollution is inescapable in segregated cities, where it is worse for everyone, according to the first breakdown of noise exposure along racial, ethnic and socioeconomic lines in the United States.

The study, led by Berkeley's environmental health scientist Dr. Joan Casey, is the first to examine noise pollution nationally through the lens of racial disparities and the extent to which noise is exacerbated by living in segregated cities. The study does not examine how noise is linked to health, but previous studies have shown that it can be associated with acute health problems such as high blood pressure and loss of sleep.

See more information about the study here.